SME Development

Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG)

Email contact: 
thag@networksgy.com
Description of organisation: 

THAG is an umbrella body of all Tourism related entities in Guyana. Members include hoteliers, resort owners, tour operators, travel agents, restaurants, jewellery and craft shops, transportation services among others. This association was formed twelve years ago by a small group of five persons. THAG is also a member of the Caribbean Hotel Association.

THAG is an umbrella body of all Tourism related entities in Guyana. Members include hoteliers, resort owners, tour operators, travel agents, restaurants, jewellery and craft shops, transportation services among others. This association was formed twelve years ago by a small group of five persons. THAG is also a member of the Caribbean Hotel Association.


thag@networksgy.com

Doing Business in Guyana

Description: 

The Doing Business database provides objective measures of business regulations and their enforcement. The Doing Business indicators are comparable across 175 economies. They indicate the regulatory costs of business and can be used to analyze specific regulations that enhance or constrain investment, productivity, and growth.
The Guyana Database can be checked here on the website of the Doing Business database


Database

The Doing Business database provides objective measures of business regulations and their enforcement. The Doing Business indicators are comparable across 175 economies. They indicate the regulatory costs of business and can be used to analyze specific regulations that enhance or constrain investment, productivity, and growth.
The Guyana Database can be checked here on the website of the Doing Business database

Assessment of the Supply and Demand of Microfinance Services for Very-Low Income Populations in Guyana and Suriname

Description: 

Executive Summary

The purpose of the consultancy is to assess the potential demand and the effective supply of microfinance products specifically designed for very low-income people in Suriname and Guyana. Results and recommendations are mainly directed to national and foreign investors (i.e. Microfinance institutions, NGOs, consortia, etc.) willing to extend their operations to potentially underserved markets.

Methodology

The consultant ran a preliminary desk activity to determine relevant providers of financial and non-financial services for poor people in Guyana and Suriname and a rough estimation of the local demand. Fieldwork consisted of meetings with market players and local population to verify estimates both of the supply and the demand. Counterproofs and feedbacks for both assessments were obtained through interviews with practitioners, national authorities and apex organizations.
The full 9MB Word document can be downloaded from the website of the Inter American Development Bank


Document

Executive Summary

The purpose of the consultancy is to assess the potential demand and the effective supply of microfinance products specifically designed for very low-income people in Suriname and Guyana. Results and recommendations are mainly directed to national and foreign investors (i.e. Microfinance institutions, NGOs, consortia, etc.) willing to extend their operations to potentially underserved markets.

Linden Economic Advancement Programme (LEAP)

Description: 

EAP is a Government of Guyana and European Union programme with the objective of fostering entrepreneurship and enterprise for economic development of the town of Linden.

In the face of continued decline of the bauxite industry in Region 10, and the consequent severe economic dislocations, the Government of Guyana and European Union initiated efforts to expand Region 10’s economic base through the diversification of the local economy away from the traditional bauxite dependency. The Linden Economic Advancement Programme LEAP was launched in 2002 with a planned injection of Euro €12 million for the execution of the project over a seven year period.


Website

EAP is a Government of Guyana and European Union programme with the objective of fostering entrepreneurship and enterprise for economic development of the town of Linden.

In the face of continued decline of the bauxite industry in Region 10, and the consequent severe economic dislocations, the Government of Guyana and European Union initiated efforts to expand Region 10’s economic base through the diversification of the local economy away from the traditional bauxite dependency. The Linden Economic Advancement Programme LEAP was launched in 2002 with a planned injection of Euro €12 million for the execution of the project over a seven year period.

Small and Medium Forest Enterprise in Guyana

Description: 

Authors : Raquel Thomas, Duncan Macqueen, Yolanda Hawker and Taryn DeMendonca
Abstract
Guyana is one of the poorest countries in South America and the Caribbean with an average per capita GDP of only US$ 2.2/day. With almost 75% of its land area covered in forest, the forest industry is important for Guyanese national development and poverty eradication. This study assesses the opportunities and constraints facing the Small and Medium Forest Enterprises (SMFEs) in Guyana. Almost all (90%) of SMFEs are owned by Guyanese individuals or family firms. Similarly, most (but not quite all) are directed towards the domestic and not the export market. The government policy towards SMFEs faces the conundrum that they are important for rural income generation, but less desirable in terms of enforceable sustainability. There is a clear need for a concerted programme of work in Guyana to address the various obstacles to economic, social and environmental sustainability faced by SMFEs. This study argues maps out how wide ownership of such a process could lead to significant gains for sustainable development.
Click here to download the report from the website of the International Institute for Environment and Development

Authors : Raquel Thomas, Duncan Macqueen, Yolanda Hawker and Taryn DeMendonca
Abstract
Guyana is one of the poorest countries in South America and the Caribbean with an average per capita GDP of only US$ 2.2/day. With almost 75% of its land area covered in forest, the forest industry is important for Guyanese national development and poverty eradication. This study assesses the opportunities and constraints facing the Small and Medium Forest Enterprises (SMFEs) in Guyana. Almost all (90%) of SMFEs are owned by Guyanese individuals or family firms. Similarly, most (but not quite all) are directed towards the domestic and not the export market. The government policy towards SMFEs faces the conundrum that they are important for rural income generation, but less desirable in terms of enforceable sustainability. There is a clear need for a concerted programme of work in Guyana to address the various obstacles to economic, social and environmental sustainability faced by SMFEs. This study argues maps out how wide ownership of such a process could lead to significant gains for sustainable development.
Click here to download the report from the website of the International Institute for Environment and Development

Competitiveness of the manufacturing and agro-industrial sector in the Caribbean with a focus on Dominica, Guyana, St. Vincent

Description: 

Background and introduction

Change is the only constant in today's global economy. Countries that are flexible and prepared to undertake necessary change are more likely to grow and prosper in this challenging economic environment. The Caribbean economies were founded on trade and exchange. As a result, global commodity shocks and the need for domestic adjustment are not new to the region. In spite of this, though, much of the Caribbean production and exports are still based on preferential access to markets. This is so whether it is sugar, bananas and rum to the European Union (EU) market under the Lomé Convention; beef, rum and tobacco to the United States under the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI); or a range of commodities to Canada under CARIBCAN, (notable exception being textiles, clothing and footwear).

Trade liberalization, market opening and access stipulations by developed countries in the 1990s mean that the era of preferences may be fast coming to a close. The market is now the major shaper of the prospects and fortunes of countries. Moreover, the market is founded on competition that rewards efficiency and productivity. This means that the competitiveness of a nation's firms is an increasingly important determinant of its ability to generate wealth in international trade. Competitive industries reinforce the virtuous link between international trade, domestic growth and employment.

The creation of the World Trade Organization (WTO) with a mandate to regulate a liberal trading regime means that Caribbean manufacturers and other producers will have to play by the rules of the game. Protectionist policies that have sheltered less efficient producers are under attack. The regional manufacturing and agro-industrial sectors will have to compete on their own merit. In addition, with changing trade rules regulated by international arbitration bodies, competition policy would provide the basis for ensuring that firms play by the rules. Such rules seek to ensure that firms are not engaged in anti-competitive practices, such as illegal mergers and acquisitions, dumping and resale price practices. As an adjunct to this, the elements of industrial policy will fall increasingly under the microscope of such dispute settlement bodies.

This study examines the competitiveness of the manufacturing sector in the Caribbean with a focus on four countries. The countries selected are Dominica, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Guyana and Trinidad and Tobago. These countries are deemed to be fairly representative of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), as a whole, in terms of the structure and market performance of the sectors. The study arose out of the recognition that the sectors have performed well below expectations in the past. The paper is divided into the following sections: Section 2 defines competitiveness and examines its foundations; Section 3 provides an analysis of the structure of the regional manufacturing sector and the factors that influence the competitiveness of the sector; Section 4 provides an indicator of manufacturing export competitiveness; Section 5 outlines some policies for strengthening the competitiveness of CARICOM manufacturers; and Section 6 draws some conclusions.
Click here to download the report from the ECLAC website

Background and introduction

Change is the only constant in today's global economy. Countries that are flexible and prepared to undertake necessary change are more likely to grow and prosper in this challenging economic environment. The Caribbean economies were founded on trade and exchange. As a result, global commodity shocks and the need for domestic adjustment are not new to the region. In spite of this, though, much of the Caribbean production and exports are still based on preferential access to markets. This is so whether it is sugar, bananas and rum to the European Union (EU) market under the Lomé Convention; beef, rum and tobacco to the United States under the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI); or a range of commodities to Canada under CARIBCAN, (notable exception being textiles, clothing and footwear).

Presidential Summit on Private Sector Development

Description: 

The Presidential Summit is an historic moment in the history of Guyana’s economic development for private and public sector leaders to collaborate in reviewing important progress achieved and in formulating and taking next action steps to create a positive economic future for the country...


Website

The Presidential Summit is an historic moment in the history of Guyana’s economic development for private and public sector leaders to collaborate in reviewing important progress achieved and in formulating and taking next action steps to create a positive economic future for the country...

Trade Policy Review - Report by the Government of Guyana

Description: 

This is the 2003 Report of the Government of Guyana to the World Trade Organisation after a review of the trade policy at the time. The document is linked from the website of the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery.


Document

This is the 2003 Report of the Government of Guyana to the World Trade Organisation after a review of the trade policy at the time. The document is linked from the website of the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery.

Report of the year 2005 - Ministry of Tourism, Industry and Commerce

Description: 

This document is the report of the Ministry for the year 2005. The Ministry has under its portfolio the areas for commerce, industry, consumer affairs , the Guyana National Bureau of Standards, the National Exhibition Centre and the Guyana Tourism Authority.


Document

This document is the report of the Ministry for the year 2005. The Ministry has under its portfolio the areas for commerce, industry, consumer affairs , the Guyana National Bureau of Standards, the National Exhibition Centre and the Guyana Tourism Authority.

Young Women's Christian Association

Email contact: 
ywca@networksgy.com
Description of organisation: 

We are committed to the promotion of the highest welfare of all women or girls, both by direct spiritual means and through social intellectual social and physical agencies, so as to help them develop their full potential and to contribute to the development of the nations by helping to mould Guyana’s womanhood.
The main subject areas of activity or programmes
Health
HIV/AIDS
Culture and art
Disabled
Women’s issues

We are committed to the promotion of the highest welfare of all women or girls, both by direct spiritual means and through social intellectual social and physical agencies, so as to help them develop their full potential and to contribute to the development of the nations by helping to mould Guyana’s womanhood.
The main subject areas of activity or programmes
Health
HIV/AIDS


www.ywca.org.gy

ywca@networksgy.com